Bushnell Scout 1000 ARC Laser Range Finder

Rangefinder
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OTHER BRANDS ARE AN OPTION. SO IS FILLING YOUR TAG. A single button ԁοеѕ thе math. Jυѕt squeeze thе shot аnԁ remember уουr knife. Amazingly compact аnԁ simple tο υѕе, ουr nеw Scout 1000 wіth ARC figures distance based οn terrain angle tο give уου аn ассυrаtе “shoots-Ɩіkе″ distance tο 1,000 yards. In Rifle Mode, іt even tells уου whеrе tο hold. AƖƖ wіth thе tap οf a button-іn a vertical unit small enough tο fit іn уουr shirt pocket. In capability аnԁ ease οf υѕе, nothing еƖѕе even comes close.

  • Compact laser rangefinder wіth Angle Range Compensation (ARC) optimized fοr bow οr gun hunting; includes carrying case, battery аnԁ neck strap
  • Attain exact distance tο target, “shoots Ɩіkе″ yardage іn Bow mode аnԁ bullet-drop/holdover data іn Rifle mode
  • 5X magnification wіth a 5 tο 1000-yard range
  • Pocket-size ergonomic design wіth textured rubber grip аnԁ rainproof construction
  • Fully multi-coated optics wіth Rain guard HD; built-іn tripod mount; 100% money back satisfaction guarantee

Bushnell Scout 1000 ARC Laser Range Finder

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3 Responses to “Bushnell Scout 1000 ARC Laser Range Finder”
  1. lilloquacious says:
    46 of 46 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Reviews were accurate–Great Product, July 19, 2011
    By 

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)

    Overall the product was great. I was buying it for bowhunting, gunhunting, range shooting and golf. The different modes for bows and guns are super cool. Before the lovefest (see below) I will start with the semi negative things I would have liked to know before buying:

    A few caveats:

    1. I wear both glasses and contacts and it works well with each, but I definitely prefer putting it all the way up to my eye with or without contacts. There is a much larger field of view that way. Glasses wearers, be aware of that.

    2. I can’t quite figure out the design of the neckstrap. Hooking it up to the unit is like any other lanyard, but the head hole itself has another two loop design, and I can’t find anything about it online. Small gripe; I may just be stupid, and I can still use the strap.

    3. It only gives readouts in whole yards. I have seen other range finders that give it to tenths of yards. This doesn’t make a difference to me, but I was expecting the decimal.

    4. The 1000 yard range is somewhat optimistic. Bow mode only goes out to 99 yards (understandably). However, to get a range beyond 800 yards in the other modes, the target must be highly reflective. In central and eastern Kentucky, we don’t have many 1000 yard patches of flat space around, so it isn’t a big deal, but again I would like to know that.

    Regardless of these things, I gave it 5 stars for a reason:

    You get a three way readout with line-of-sight distance from lens to target, the angle of that line of sight (+/- x degrees), and in bow mode you get a compensated distance (the target is 30 yards away, but given the angle you should aim as if it were 25 yards to be right on it) and in gun mode it gives you bullet drop (aim 25 inches high). The gun mode accounts for distance, angle and the type of bullet you are shooting. There is a list available on the disk in the box with the rangefinder where you find the exact round you are firing, including brand, caliber, type, and grain and it tells you which preset it corresponds to (A-J). This includes muzzleloader settings as well. There are thousands of rounds available on this list. If you buy your ammo at a sporting goods store or department, you can find it on the list. There is also a regular mode without any angle readout, but aren’t you buying the ARC version of the scout for a reason? :)

    Additionally, you can toggle between two settings where you can scan across an area, and the Scout will only range the farthest object you hit or the closest. Example: there is a deer you can see through a tree branch, but you cannot get the sight only on the deer and keep hitting the tree–in this mode you just scan along the body of the deer and although your laser also hits the tree branch, the Scout knows only to give you the range of the farthest object. Conversely, at a distance if you see a deer in front of a backdrop of trees or land, but the deer is too small to keep the aim on, you can scan on the deer and even if you slip off of it, only the range of the closest object (the deer) will be reported.

    The optics are very clear. The 5x magnification is a good distance, and the focus control works nicely. The ranging works even better in low light than in brighter conditions. You can easily switch to meters (and centimeters in bullet drop) for all the metric fans out there. I grew up using yards, so despite the logic of the metric system, I keep using it when shooting.

    All of this met my needs, and at a price of USD$240, I don’t think you can beat it.

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  2. J. Smith says:
    44 of 47 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    Very nice, but major functionality missing, October 19, 2010
    By 
    J. Smith (Utah, USA) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    I purchased the Scout 1000 and found the performance and quality to be quite good. The ergonomics were wonderful. Overall, I was quite impressed with the product. The supplied case was of poor quality – the latch could easily come undone and the rangefinder lost if you were scrambling through thick brush.

    The biggest flaw is that it does not present true horizontal distance or (as they put it) “shoots-like” distance beyond 100 yards. Instead, beyond 100 yards you are required to go through a complex process of entering your rifle’s ballistics category and then the range finder shows you the true distance and an approximate holdover distance. This information might be helpful for novice shooters that simply want to get ‘close enough’, but it is virtually worthless for the many rifle shooters that are using a scope with a B&C, BDC, Ballistic, or similar reticle or turret. With these scopes, you only want to know the true horizontal distance. And that’s all. You then adjust the turret or you hold over to the correct scope reticle marker for that distance.

    For example, if the true horizontal distance for a steep uphill shot is 500 yards, you simply place the 500 yard reticle in your scope on the target and shoot (all other things considered). This is MUCH easier and more accurate than guessing a 42.4 inch holdover measurements at 500 yards. With the Scout 1000, because of an inexplicable design decision, you cannot know the true horizontal distance over 100 yards. In this scenario, the Scout will only report true distance of maybe 550 yards – which if used, will result in a miss, or worse, an injured animal. This lack of functionality renders the rangefinder or your expensive rifle scope mostly useless.

    I returned this product and opted for the less expensive Nikon RifleHunter 550 which has at least equal performance to the Scout out to the full 550 yards, but more importantly, it provides true horizontal distance at all distances – critical functionality for serious rifle hunters.

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  3. Ronald L. Walker says:
    15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    superior, November 13, 2010
    By 
    Ronald L. Walker (idaho) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)

    I tried to compare this item to a nikon 440 I already own. Beyond 250 yards in brushy terrain there is no comparison. Bushnell wins hands down. In good light it will accurately range hard objects out to 850 yards.

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